Regional Feasibility Assessments

Subregional case studies of alternative approaches to water sustainability

BUDGET

  • $550,000 estimated total

PROJECT SCHEDULE

  • Estimated completion in June 2017
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SUMMARY

The Metropolitan Council, in conjunction with HDR Engineering, Inc., is conducting technical analyses supporting long-term reliability and sustainability of water supplies in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. This effort evaluates a variety of approaches to support sustainable water supplies across the metro area. Sub-regional study areas were selected where communities face potential problems with the long-term sustainability of current water supplies, and where community stakeholders expressed interest in learning more about sustainable water supply options.

Three sub-regional areas are being evaluated and the results are compiled in study area reports.

The first sub-regional area includes communities in the southeastern portion of the metro area (Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eagan, Empire Township, Farmington, Inver Grove Heights, Lakeville, Mendota Heights, Rosemount, South St. Paul and West St. Paul). These communities have formed a groundwater workgroup to address the issue of future water source sustainability. A study led by the Council to examine the feasibility of alternative approaches to water supply in the Southeast Metro has been prepared. Alternatives considered in the Southeast Metro report included demand reduction through municipal water conservation, the increased use of surface water sources to meet drinking water demands, the capture and reuse of stormwater to serve non-potable uses, and the potential to enhance recharge to local aquifers.

The second sub-regional area includes communities in the northeastern portion of the metro area (Centerville, Circle Pines, Columbus, Forest Lake, Hugo, Lexington, Lino Lakes, Mahtomedi, North St. Paul, St. Paul, Shoreview, Vadnais Heights, White Bear Lake, and White Bear Township). A study led by the Council to examine the feasibility of alternative approaches to water supply in the Northeast Metro has been prepared. The study area boundary was designed to match the North and East Groundwater Management Area as defined by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Alternatives considered in the North and East Metro report included the capture and reuse of stormwater to serve non-potable uses, and the potential to enhance recharge to local aquifers.

The third sub-regional area includes communities in the northwestern portion of the metro area (Anoka, Andover, Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Champlin, Coon Rapids, Corcoran, Dayton, Fridley, Maple Grove, Osseo, Ramsey and Rogers). A study led by the Council to examine the feasibility of alternative approaches to water supply in the Northwest Metro has been prepared. Alternatives considered in the Northwest Metro report included demand reduction through municipal water conservation, the use of surface water sources to meet drinking water demands, the capture and reuse of stormwater to serve non-potable uses, and the potential to enhance recharge to local aquifers.

The analysis of enhanced aquifer recharge was expanded to include all seven counties in the metropolitan area. This work can be found in the Metro Wide Studies and Reports below. Metadata for this analysis is available from the Council.

DELIVERABLES

Sub Regional Technical Analyses

  • Identification of sub-regional study areas and stakeholder participants (PDF, 2 MB)
  • Criteria for identifying feasible approaches to sustainable water supply development in different parts of the metro area
  • Identification of feasible water supply approaches for each study area
  • An assessment of infrastructure costs and other challenges to the implementation of alternative water supply systems, along with regional benefits

Sub Regional Studies and Reports

Metro Wide Studies and Reports

  • Technical Memorandum: Groundwater Recharge Study of the Seven County Metropolitan Area (Expected June 2017)
 

OUTCOMES

  • Potential solutions to address emerging sub-regional water supply issues are identified
  • Alternative approaches to water sustainability will be evaluated to provide better information to decision-makers in choosing a path forward toward regional water supply sustainability