Suburban Change in the Twin Cities Region

Our region’s suburbs have been changing in terms of their demographics, housing markets, and built environment. This project provides census-tract level information about these changes to offer additional technical assistance to communities in their small-area planning efforts. The technical assistance includes a compilation of planning resources such as planning strategies and best practices used by communities in the Twin Cities metro area and elsewhere.

The information provided here is intended to help communities better understand the smaller scale changes taking place within their communities. By providing this information on one web platform, the Council also aims to facilitate information sharing across communities experiencing similar types of change.

This study focuses on the census tract-level changes that took place between 2000 and 2017. It groups census tracts according to the types of change they experienced by using a longitudinal clustering algorithm. Each type includes a group of census tracts that share similar trends in their demographics, housing markets, and built environments.

This study identifies seven distinct types of change. Local planners can examine these types in detail by using an interactive visual tool that displays data at the census tract level. The compilation of planning resources, which are uniquely tailored for each type of change, are organized according to type-specific issues that communities might want to address.

Read the full report (PDF) that includes a detailed discussion of the seven types of change and the study methodology.

Demographics

  • Share of people of color highest and increasing

  • Share of residents age 65 and over remained lowest

  • Share of residents age 18 or younger highest and increasing

  • Median income remained lowest
     

Built Environment

  • Limited construction activity; mostly in the undeveloped parts of inner-ring suburbs

Housing Market

  • Home values lowest and slow to recover from the Great Recession

  • Rents lowest but increasing since 2010

  • Share of rental properties remained lowest

     

This map shows the location of Type A census tracts.There were only two suburban census tracts in this type, and both were in the City of Brooklyn Park.

Race, age, poverty, and housing tenure in Type A tracts distinguished them from other types.

Type A census tracts were established communities of color with the highest shares of people of color in the study area. Unlike the urban Type A tracts, where the shares of people of color remained high and steady, suburban Type A tracts experienced continuous growth in the share of people of color. By 2017, suburban Type A tracts had the highest share of people of color in the study area.

Type A was the only type where generational transition had already happened; in other words, younger families with school-age children replaced older households. The share of senior residents, which was the lowest among all types, remained roughly the same, and the share of school-age children, which was already the highest among all types, continued to increase.

Type A census tracts had the highest rates of poverty among all types. Having spiked during the recession, poverty rates barely declined after the recession. These tracts had the lowest median incomes among all types in all three time points. Median incomes, which declined significantly by the end of the 2000s, remained the same during the 2010s.

The housing stock in Type A tracts continued to have the highest share of rental properties among all types. Median rents, which were the lowest among all types, decreased during the 2000s and started going up during the 2010s.The housing stock of Type A tracts was the most affordable in the study area. Median home values, which declined sharply during the recession, bounced back to some extent—although not to pre-recession levels. Type A tracts had limited construction activity, which took place in the undeveloped parts of Brooklyn Park.

Demographics

  • Second highest share of people of color and rapidly increasing

  • Share of residents age 65 and older static

  • Share of residents age 18 or younger increasing

  • Continued to have the second lowest incomes

     

Built Environment

  • Most census tracts located in mostly developed first-ring suburbs

  • Construction activity remained slowest

     

Housing Market

  • Home values second lowest and slow to recover from the Great Recession

  • Rents low but increasing

  • Share of rental properties remained third highest

     

This map shows the location of Type B census tracts.Type B tracts were mostly located in older, inner-ring suburban areas such as Columbia Heights, Fridley, Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Roseville, Richfield and Bloomington with a few exceptions in outer suburbs such as Shakopee, Savage, Apple Valley, and Eagan.

Demographic trends and housing market dynamics were the main factors that influenced change in Type B census tracts. Race, age, poverty, and median home values were the characteristics that distinguished Type B tracts from others.

Racially, Type B tracts had the second highest share of people of color and this share increased the fastest among all types. The age profile of Type B tracts revealed that they were just beginning to go through generational transition. In these tracts, the share of senior residents stayed roughly the same while the share of school-age children slightly increased.

Poverty rates in Type B at all three time points were the second highest in the study area; in 2017, one in three residents lived in poverty. Poverty rates in Type B census tracts increased significantly between 2000 and 2010 and barely declined during the 2010s. Median incomes were the second lowest in the study area at all three time points. Like in most of the study area, median household incomes declined during the recession and did not increase much after the recession.

The trajectory of median home values in Type B tracts stood out. Unlike in many other types of tracts, where home markets either started recovering or already bounced back significantly, in Type B tracts home values were especially slow to recover from the recession. Median home values were the second lowest among all types. Rents in these census tracts declined during the 2000s and started increasing during the 2010s. Type B tracts experienced the slowest construction activity among all types.

Demographics

  • Steady inflow of people of color

  • High and increasing share of residents age 65 or older

  • Declining share of residents age 18 or younger

  • Moderate incomes stabilized after a decline in 2000s

     

Built Environment

  • Historically white and working class

  • Mostly developed

  • Construction activity remained limited

Housing Market

  • Home values remained below study area medians; slow to recover from the Great Recession

  • Rents below study area median and increasing since the Recession

  • Share of rental properties moderate and increasing

     

This map shows the location of Type C census tracts.Type C tracts were historically white, working class areas with an affordable housing stock that was built mostly between World War II and the 1970s.

Housing market dynamics and demographic trends shaped the types of change in Type C tracts. Home values, race, age, and economic characteristics of these tracts distinguished them from other types.

The housing stock of Type C tracts was very affordable: median home values in Type C tracts remained below the study area medians at all time points. However, recovery from the recession had yet to occur. Rents, which remained below the study area medians, started increasing in the 2010s.

Even though the population of Type C tracts barely grew, its racial composition changed significantly. While Type C tracts remained predominantly white until the 2000s, they experienced a steady inflow of residents of color during the study period. The share of people of color in these tracts reached the study area median by 2017.

The distinct housing stock of these tracts shaped their demographic characteristics to a large extent. Single-story rambler homes made up most of the housing stock in Type C tracts. This type of housing, known for its single-story, age-friendly architecture, was affordable to people on fixed incomes. This allowed senior residents to age in place and delayed generational transition. The share of senior residents in these tracts was very high and continued to increase, while the share of school-age children gradually declined.

The housing stock of Type C tracts also shaped the economic makeup of these tracts. The affordability of the housing stock allowed residents with moderate incomes to live in these tracts. Income trends in Type C tracts mirrored the trends in the study area: median household incomes finally stabilized after a sharp decline during the 2000s.

Type C tracts stood out in terms of their poverty trends. The poverty rates in these tracts continued to increase even as they were declining elsewhere in high-poverty census tracts. Poverty rates increased in other types of tracts as well. Yet, none of these other types faced the rapidly growing concentration of poverty that Type C tracts experienced. 

Construction activity in Type C tracts remained slower than the activity taking place in the study area.

Demographics

  • High and increasing share of people of color; immigrant hubs

  • Share of residents 65 or older moderate but increasing

  • Share of residents 18 or younger lowest and static

  • Median incomes remained lower than study area medians
     

Built Environment

  • Construction activity remained below study area median

Housing Market

  • Home values above study area medians; recovered from the Great Recession

  • Moderate rents increasing since 2010

  • Share of rental properties remained second highest

This map shows the location of Type D census tracts.Type D tracts were in areas such as Bloomington, Eden Prairie, Hopkins, St. Louis Park, St. Anthony, Falcon Heights and Lauderdale.

Housing market characteristics and demographic trends shaped the types of change taking place in Type D census tracts. The rent tenure of these tracts as well as the racial and economic makeup of their residents distinguished Type D tracts from others.

Type D tracts stood out in terms of their exceptionally high percentages of rental units—the second highest in the study area. Median gross rents, which were relatively affordable compared to the rest of the study area, increased more than most types during the 2010s after declining between 2000 and 2010.

Housing markets in Type D census tracts were the fastest to recover from the recession. Median home values, which remained above the study area medians between 2000 and 2017, bounced back to pre-recession levels, after declining significantly during recession.

The demographics of suburban and urban tracts differed in Type D areas. Suburban Type D tracts had shares of people of color well above the study area medians and they continued to become more racially diverse. The share of people of color increased rapidly, especially in Hopkins, St. Louis Park and Eden Prairie.

Changes in the population of residents with limited English proficiency in Type D tracts suggests that these areas became immigrant hubs within the study area. In these tracts, the share of residents with limited English proficiency was a lot higher than the study area medians at all three time points. Moreover, this increase was the highest among all types in the study area.

Poverty in Type D tracts decreased significantly during the 2010s after increasing during the 2000s. In fact, the decline in poverty rates in these tracts was the largest among all types. Despite this decrease, however, poverty rates in Type D census tracts were still above the study area median in 2017.
Residents of Type D census tracts had median incomes that were lower than the study area medians and the income trends in these tracts were consistent with the rest of the study area: median household incomes in these tracts declined during the 2000s and remained around the same level during the 2010s. 

The share of school-age children in Type D tracts, which was the lowest among all types, stayed roughly the same during the study period. In contrast, the share of senior residents started increasing by 2010.

Construction activity in Type D tracts remained limited, yet stronger than in most types during the 2000s. Since 2010, construction declined significantly as it did in the rest of the study area.

Demographics

  • Share of people of color below study area median but increasing

  • Share of residents 65 or older the highest and rapidly increasing

  • Share of residents 18 or younger remained below study area median

  • Median incomes remained above study area medians
     

Built Environment

  • Large, high-density infill development near transportation networks and job centers

Housing Market

  • Home values remained above study area medians

  • Rents remained above study area medians

  • Share of rental properties above study area median and increasing

This map shows the location of Type E census tracts.Type E tracts were in areas that were near transportation networks and established job centers.

Built environment trends and housing market dynamics impacted the types of change taking place in Type E tracts. Infill development and structure of the housing markets were among the distinctive characteristics of these tracts.

Despite being mostly developed, Type E tracts had noticeable construction activity. Most of the construction took the form of large-scale, high-density infill development and redevelopment, especially in areas with easy access to jobs. For example, Golden Valley and parts of St. Louis Park along the I-394 job corridor and the Southdale area in Edina attracted clusters of large-scale apartment projects. Similarly, Roseville experienced high-density infill development, primarily in the form of senior housing.

Housing markets in these tracts were distinct. Infill development contributed to a growing rental market since a significant portion of this development involved the construction of expensive high-density apartment complexes. Median home values and gross rents in Type E tracts remained above the study area medians during the study period. While housing markets in these tracts bounced back from the recession, home values had not yet returned to pre-recession levels. Median gross rents, however, started increasing after the recession after a sharp decline during the 2000s.

Type E tracts had the highest and most rapidly increasing share of seniors in the study area and population in these tracts did not change much. These characteristics indicated some degree of aging in place in Type E census tracts. High-density infill development that came in the form of multifamily apartment buildings and senior housing complexes probably provided options for older adults who wanted to remain in their communities.

The share of people of color, which remained below the study area median, continued to increase during the study period. Type E tracts, which already had a highly educated population, experienced an influx of residents with graduate/professional degrees. Economically, incomes remained above the study area medians. In contrast, poverty levels remained below the study area medians at all three time points.

Demographics

  • Share of people of color remained second lowest

  • Share of residents 65 or older remained second lowest

  • Share of residents 18 or younger remained second highest

  • Median incomes stayed above study area medians
     

Built Environment

  • Strongest but slowing construction activity in mostly exurban areas

  • Primarily greenfield development

     

Housing Market

  • Home values above study area medians and increasing; not yet back to pre-recession levels

  • Rents second highest and increasing

  • Share of rental properties remained second lowest

This map shows the location of Type F census tracts.Type F tracts were in the mostly exurban parts of the study area such as Shakopee, Woodbury, Blaine, Lakeville and Maple Grove.

Built environment dynamics and demographic trends shaped the specific types of change that took place in Type F areas. Their development patterns and age profiles distinguished Type F tracts from other types in the study area.

Type F areas stood out in terms of the high rate of development—the highest in the study area—they experienced since the 1990s. While development activity slowed somewhat during the 2000s, residential construction in these areas remained well above the study area medians in 2000 and 2010. Since Type F tracts were among the most recently developed areas, most of the construction activity took the form of greenfield development.

Strong construction activity in Type F tracts went hand in hand with rapid growth in population. These tracts experienced the highest rates of population growth, mostly due to an inflow of families with school-age children. Population in these areas remained on the younger end of the spectrum: Type F tracts continued to have the second highest share of school-age children and the second lowest share of senior residents during the study period.

The share of people of color in Type F tracts remained the second lowest among all types despite some increase in racial and ethnic diversity. Median household incomes in Type F areas stayed above the study area medians and these areas continued to have the second lowest poverty level in the study area.

Median home values, which declined during the 2000s, started increasing during the 2010s but had not yet bounced back to pre-recession levels. Rents, which were the second highest in the study area, started going up in the post-recession period. Type F tracts had the second lowest share of rental units among all types.

Demographics

  • Share of people of color remained lowest

  • Share of residents 65 or older remained below study area median but increasing

  • Share of residents 18 or younger remained second highest

  • Incomes remained highest

Built Environment

  • Significant construction activity that slowed down

  • Close to natural amenities

     

Housing Market

  • Remained the most expensive housing stock; home values fully recovered from the recession

  • Rents remained highest

  • Share of rental properties remained lowest

     

This map shows the location of Type G census tracts.With some exceptions, Type G tracts were mostly outside the I-494 and I-694 ring, in the exurban parts of the study area in communities such as Shoreview, Lino Lakes, Plymouth, Minnetonka, Savage, Shakopee, Prior Lake, Apple Valley, Rosemount, Lake Elmo and Stillwater. Most of these tracts had or were near natural amenities such as lakes, parks and other bodies of water.

Built environment trends and demographic dynamics were the main factors that changed Type G tracts. Their development patterns and their age and income characteristics made them stand out among other types.

Type G tracts experienced strong construction activity and development remained above the study area levels during the 1990s. The share of recently built housing stock was especially high—the second highest in the study area—in 2000, suggesting that most of the construction activity in Type G took place during the 1990s. While this share dipped below the study area median from 2000 to 2010, significant construction activity took place during the 2000s, although at a slower pace than in the 1990s. Between 2010 and 2017, in the post-recession period, construction activity in Type G tracts almost came to a complete halt as it did in the rest of the study area.

The age profile of Type G tracts was closely aligned with the development patterns in these areas. The share of school-age children peaked in 2000 after the big burst of development during the 1990s, suggesting that most of the population growth during that time came from the inflow of families with school-age children. A similar but somewhat slower pattern of growth occurred during the 2000s: the inflow of families with school-age children fueled growth but at a slower rate. The share of school-age children in Type G tracts continued to decline as development dropped to almost nothing during the 2010s. Despite this overall decline, however, Type G areas continued to have some of the highest shares of school-age children in the study area.

Type G tracts also stood out in terms of their income. Overall, these tracts were the study area’s most affluent tracts; their median household incomes remained the highest in the study area at all three time points. Even after the sharp declines in median household incomes during the 2000s, median household incomes in Type G tracts remained well above the study area medians. Racially, Type G tracts remained predominantly white. In fact, these tracts had the lowest percentages of people of color among all types at all three time points. These areas also experienced the smallest increase in racial diversity during the study period.

Type G tracts continued to have the most expensive housing stock throughout the study period. Housing markets fully recovered from the recession; in fact, median home values in 2017 exceeded the pre-recession values. Median gross rents in these areas remained the highest in the study area and rents started increasing after a sharp decline during the recession. These tracts continued to have the lowest share of rental units in the study area.

The following are the resources that can be used to address the needs and opportunities arising out of the demographic and housing market trends taking place in Type A tracts. The following trends shaped change in Type A tracts: growing share of people of color; growing share of school-age children; steadily high poverty; continuously high share of rental units in the housing stock.

 

Growing Racial Diversity 

Planning needs are likely to change as the resident body becomes more racially and ethnically diverse.

Strategic place making investments can leverage the cultural assets of residents and boost private investment. 

Supporting and attracting minority-owned and other businesses oriented toward the needs of a more racially and ethnically diverse clientele might enhance the economic standing of these tracts and residents and appeal to the changing preferences of the residents. 

Communities can offer multicultural services and cultural liaisons to facilitate equitable access to city services.

Investing in recreational facilities that are of interest to a more diverse population can serve the residents of Type A tracts better.

Communities with growing populations of color may benefit from racial equity initiatives that to address the needs of their residents.
The changing racial and ethnic profile of these tracts might require changes in community outreach methods.
 

A Younger Population 

Since Type A areas continued to have the highest shares of school-age children in the study area, youth-oriented services can be important for meeting the needs of school-age children.

Youth engagement programs can provide extracurricular enrichment opportunities for school-age children and help provide a platform for expressing their needs. 

Youth safety programs can ensure the safe movement of school-age children in their communities.

Programs that give youth a place to be outside of school can ensure they stay safe, healthy, active and engaged in the community.

Youth employment programs can provide youth with opportunities to work and prepare them for entering the work force as adults.
 

Persistent High Poverty 

Addressing persistent poverty might require place- and people-based strategies. Place-based strategies such as neighborhood revitalization programs might help ensure the vitality of locally owned businesses. People-based anti-poverty strategies such as workforce development efforts and job search assistance can enhance the employment opportunities of residents and prevent them from falling into poverty.

High-poverty tracts can benefit from neighborhood-based community development plans.

To address poverty, communities can provide workforce development and job search assistance programs.

 

Persistently High Share of Rental Properties

Maintaining a high-quality rental housing stock is essential in type A areas where rental properties make up nearly four fifths of the housing stock. Strategies to diversify the tenure of the housing stock can serve these communities well by helping residents build wealth over time.

Robust rental inspection programs can help ensure a high-quality rental stock and help meet the needs of renters.

Communities can diversify their housing stock through home buyer assistance programs which can help residents build wealth over time.

The following are the resources that can be used to address the needs and opportunities arising out of the demographic trends and housing market dynamics taking place in Type B tracts. The following trends shaped change in Type B tracts: growing share of people of color, growing share of school age children; steadily high rates of poverty; slow recovery of home values.

 

Growing Racial Diversity

Planning needs are likely to change as the resident body becomes more racially and ethnically diverse.

Strategic place making investments can leverage the cultural assets of residents and boost private investment.

Supporting and attracting minority-owned and other businesses oriented toward the needs of a more racially and ethnically diverse clientele might enhance the economic standing of these tracts and residents and appeal to the changing preferences of the residents.

Communities can offer multicultural services and cultural liaisons to facilitate equitable access to city services.

Investing in recreational facilities that are of interest to a more diverse population can serve the residents of Type B tracts better.

Communities with growing populations of color may benefit from racial equity initiatives to address the needs of their residents.

The changing racial and ethnic profile of these tracts might require changes in community engagement methods.
 

A Younger Population

Since Type B areas continued to have high and increasing shares of school-age children, youth-oriented services can be important for meeting the needs of school-age children.

Youth engagement programs can provide extracurricular enrichment opportunities for school-age children and help provide a platform for expressing their needs.

Youth safety programs can ensure the safe movement of school-age children in their communities.

Programs that give youth a place to be outside of school can ensure they stay safe, healthy, active and engaged in the community.

Youth employment programs can provide youth with opportunities to work and prepare them for entering the workforce as adults.

 

Persistent High Poverty

Addressing persistent poverty might require place- and people-based strategies. Place-based strategies such as neighborhood revitalization programs might help ensure the vitality of locally owned businesses. People-based anti-poverty strategies such as housing stability programs, workforce development efforts, job search assistance can enhance the employment opportunities of residents and provide opportunities for wealth creation and wealth building.

High-poverty tracts can benefit from neighborhood-based community development plans.

To address poverty, communities can provide workforce development and job search assistance programs.

 

Slow Recovery of Home Values

If recovery from the housing market crisis remains slow, ownership housing in Type B census tracts might face the risk of deterioration. Maintaining the quality of housing is essential for fending off this risk and boosting home values. Since these census tracts have modest incomes and high poverty and since they are in the middle of generational transition, they might face issues related to deferred maintenance. Housing rehabilitation, maintenance, and weatherization programs might help residents catch up with deferred maintenance and enable home improvements necessary to maintain the quality of housing and boost home values in Type B tracts.

Housing rehabilitation, maintenance, and weatherization programs can help residents catch up with deferred maintenance and maintain the quality of the housing stock.

Energy conservation and weatherization programs can help residents enable home improvements necessary to maintain the quality of housing.

The following are the resources that can be used to address the needs and opportunities arising out of the housing market trends dynamics and demographic trends taking place in Type C tracts. The following trends shaped change in Type C tracts: slow recovery of housing values, growing share of older adults, growing racial diversity, and increasing poverty.

 

Slow Recovery of Home Values

Given the old housing stock in these neighborhoods, maintaining the quality of housing is essential to the recovery of home values. If recovery from the housing market crisis remains slow, ownership housing in Type C census tracts might face the risk of deterioration. Maintaining the quality of housing is essential for fending off this risk and boosting home values. Since these census tracts have modest incomes and growing numbers of fixed-income retirees, they might face issues related to deferred maintenance. Housing rehabilitation, maintenance, and weatherization programs might help residents catch up with deferred maintenance and enable home improvements necessary to maintain the quality of housing and boost home values in Type C tracts.

Housing rehabilitation and maintenance programs can help residents catch up with deferred maintenance. Since these census tracts have modest incomes and growing numbers of fixed-income retirees, they might face issues related to deferred maintenance.

Energy conservation and weatherization programs can help residents enable home improvements necessary to maintain the quality of housing.

 

Growing Senior Population

Meeting the needs of a growing population of older adults might require efforts to facilitate aging in place and to create age-friendly communities.

Diversifying the housing stock by encouraging multi-family housing for senior residents and accessory dwelling units can help accommodate the needs of older adults in search of lower-maintenance housing options.

Housing rehabilitation, maintenance, and accessibility programs can help older adults live in their own homes longer.

Creating age-friendly communities might help anticipate the needs of senior residents.

Senior engagement programs can provide volunteering opportunities for older adults and help provide a platform for serving their needs.

 

Growing Racial Diversity 

Planning needs are likely to change as the resident body becomes more racially and ethnically diverse.

Strategic place making investments can leverage the cultural assets of residents and boost private investment. 

Supporting and attracting minority-owned and other businesses oriented toward the needs of a more racially and ethnically diverse clientele might enhance the economic standing of these tracts and residents and appeal to the changing preferences of the residents.

Communities can offer multicultural services and cultural liaisons to facilitate equitable access to city services.​

Investing in recreational facilities that are of interest to a more diverse population can serve the residents of Type C tracts better.  

Communities with growing populations of color may benefit from racial equity initiatives that address the needs of their increasingly diverse body of residents.

The changing racial and ethnic profile of these tracts might require changes in community enagagement methods.

 

Growing Poverty

Curbing growing poverty might require people- and place-based strategies. Place-based strategies such as neighborhood revitalization programs might help ensure the vitality of locally owned businesses. People-based anti-poverty strategies such as workforce development efforts and job search assistance can enhance the employment opportunities of residents and prevent them from falling into poverty.

Tracts with increasing-poverty rates can benefit from neighborhood-based community development plans.

Communities can provide workforce development and job search assistance programs to improve the employment prospects of residents.

The following are the resources that can be used to address the needs and opportunities arising out of the housing market trends and demographic changes taking place in Type D tracts. The following trends shaped change in these tracts: persistently high share of rental properties; high and increasing share of people of color and people with limited English proficiency; declining yet high poverty. 

 

Persistently High Share of Rental Properties

Maintaining a high-quality rental housing stock is essential in Type D areas where rental properties make up two thirds of the housing stock. Strategies to diversify the tenure of the housing stock can serve these communities well by helping residents build wealth over time.

Robust rental inspection programs can help ensure a high-quality rental stock and help meet the needs of renters.

Communities can diversify their housing stock through home buyer assistance programs which can help residents build wealth over time.

 

Growing Racial and Ethnic Diversity

Planning needs are likely to change as the resident body becomes more racially and ethnically diverse.

Strategic placemaking investments can leverage the cultural assets of residents and boost private investment.

Supporting and attracting minority-owned and other businesses oriented toward the needs of a more racially and ethnically diverse clientele might enhance the economic standing of these tracts and residents and appeal to the changing preferences of the residents.

Given the high and growing shares of people with limited English proficiency, communities with Type D tracts can benefit from offering multicultural services and cultural liaisons to facilitate equitable access to city services.

Investing in recreational facilities that are of interest to a more diverse population can serve the residents of Type D tracts better.

Communities with growing populations of color may benefit from racial equity initiatives to address the needs of their residents.

The changing racial and ethnic profile of these tracts might require changes in community outreach methods.

 

Declining Yet High Poverty

Addressing poverty might require place- and people-based strategies. Place-based strategies such as neighborhood revitalization programs might help ensure the vitality of locally owned businesses. People-based anti-poverty strategies such as workforce development efforts and job search assistance can enhance the employment opportunities of residents and prevent them from falling into poverty.

High-poverty tracts can benefit from neighborhood-based community development initiatives.

To address poverty, communities can provide workforce development and job search assistance programs.

The following are the resources that can be used to address the needs and opportunities arising out of the built environment trends and housing market dynamics in Type E tracts. The following trends shaped change in Type E tracts: infill development and a high and growing share of older adults.

 

Infill Development

Careful planning of large-scale, high-density infill and redevelopment projects offer multiple opportunities for improving the built environment of these census tracts.

Smooth integration of new projects into the existing fabric of these tracts could be occasions for increasing walkability, enriching the streetscape, and ensuring the continuing vitality of Type E census tracts.

Integration of new projects into the existing infrastructure can create opportunities to proactively plan infrastructure investments in these areas.

The proximity of Type E tracts to established and growing job centers and their high-density development patterns make them good candidates for transit and transit-oriented development. Transit-oriented development strategies can not only catalyze further investment in these areas and present new opportunities for stimulating the local economy, but also create places where residents live, work, and play.

 

Growing Senior Population

Meeting the needs of a growing population of older adults might require efforts to facilitate aging in place and to create age-friendly communities.

Diversifying the housing stock by encouraging multi-family housing for senior residents and accessory dwelling units can help accommodate the needs of older adults in search of lower-maintenance housing options.

Housing rehabilitation, maintenance, and accessibility programs can help older adults live in their own homes longer. 

Creating age-friendly communities might help anticipate the needs of senior residents.

Senior engagement programs can provide volunteering opportunities for older adults and help provide a platform for serving their needs.

The following are the resources that can be used to address the needs and opportunities arising out of the built environment dynamics and demographic trends taking place in Type F tracts. The following trends shaped change in Type F tracts: history of rapid greenfield development and continuing presence of a younger population.

 

Rapid Greenfield Development

Since Type F tracts experienced significant growth in terms of home construction, meeting the infrastructure needs of these areas might potentially be challenging. The infrastructure needs of these tracts are likely to relate to storm water management, low-impact development, water conservation, and natural resource protection.

Communities can benefit from strategic and proactive planning of stormwater infrastructure to keep up with the infrastructure needs of fast growth in population and home construction.

Low Impact Development (LID) is an approach to stormwater managementin greenfield developmen that mimics a site’s natural hydrology as the landscape is developed. It preserves and protects environmentally sensitive site features and minimizes stormwater runoff and pollution by keeping the rain where it falls.

Water conservation strategies can help communities manage their long-term water supply.

Natural resource preservation strategies can help protect environmental assets in communities experiencing rapid growth and greenfield development.

 

A Younger Population

Youth-oriented services can be important for meeting the needs of the large number of families with school-age children.

Youth engagement programs can provide extracurricular enrichment opportunities for school-age children and help provide a platform for expressing their needs.

Youth safety programs can ensure the safe movement of school-age children in their communities.

Programs that give youth a place to be outside of school can ensure they stay safe, healthy, active and engaged in the community.

The following are resources that can be used to address the needs and opportunities arising out of the built environment dynamics and demographic trends taking place in Type G tracts. The following trends shaped change in Type G tracts: history of rapid greenfield development, continuing presence of a younger population; consistently high median incomes.

 

Rapid Greenfield Development

Since Type G tracts experienced significant growth in terms of home construction, meeting the infrastructure needs of these areas might potentially be challenging. The infrastructure needs of Type G tracts are likely to relate to storm water management, low-impact development, water conservation, and natural resource protection.

Communities can benefit from strategic investments in stormwater management to keep up with the pollutants such as sediment and phosphorus which are carried with the runoff water. Management of stormwater runoff entails intercepting and treating the runoff water, protecting valuable natural resources in these communities.

Low Impact Development (LID) is an approach to stormwater management that mimics a site’s natural hydrology as the landscape is developed. It preserves and protects environmentally sensitive site features and minimizes stormwater runoff and pollution by keeping the rain where it falls.

Water conservation strategies can help communities manage their long-term water supply.

 

A Younger Population

Since Type G areas continued to have some of the highest shares of school-age children in the study area, youth-oriented services can be important for meeting the needs of school-age children.

Youth engagement programs can provide extracurricular enrichment opportunities for school-age children and help provide a platform for expressing their needs.

Youth safety programs can ensure the safe movement of school-age children in their communities.

Programs that give youth a place to be outside of school can ensure they stay safe, healthy, active and engaged in the community.

 

Continuously High Incomes

Due to their consistently high incomes, residents in Type G tracts may have access to high-value homes near natural resources. The expensive housing stock of these tracts translates into a large tax base—an asset that could help these communities invest in opportunities to enhance access to natural amenities and address issues such as natural resource protection.

Recreational opportunities that capitalize on the proximity of these areas to natural amenities can serve the interests of residents of all ages.

Wildlife preservation and resource conservation strategies can help protect natural resources.