Research by topic

Data-driven insights to further regional conversations that matter

New! Twin Cities Greenhouse Gas Inventory—Interactive

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Climate change is occurring all around the world, including right here in the Twin Cities region. Minnesota has already experienced more extreme rainfall and warmer winters due to climate change, and more changes are on the way. The good news is that local jurisdictions can take meaningful action now to address climate change.

The Twin Cities Greenhouse Gas Inventory summarizes the sources of greenhouse gas emissions by jurisdiction and tracks how emissions are changing over time. Explore how and where local actions and strategies can reduce future greenhouse gases. New sections and data will up added to this tool throughout 2020. 
 

New! Twin Cities Rent Trends—Interactive

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The Twin Cities Rent Trends interactive presents rent and vacancy trends for the Twin Cities region by jurisdiction or neighborhood, where available.

Timely data on rents can be difficult and costly to obtain, and different data sources can yield significantly different values. This interactive tool allows users to:
  • View rents and vacancy rates trends between 2010 and 2019 at sub-regional levels
  • Map rental costs region-wide
  • Compare three popular data sources: Zillow, CoStar, and Rental Revue.
  • Download the dataset, based on your selections

The Twin Cities Greenhouse Gas Inventory—Interactive

The-Twin-Cities-Greenhouse-Gas-Inventory.png
Climate change is occurring all around the world, including right here in the Twin Cities region. Minnesota has already experienced more extreme rainfall and warmer winters due to climate change, and more changes are on the way. The good news is that local jurisdictions can take meaningful action now to address climate change. The Twin Cities Greenhouse Gas Inventory summarizes the sources of emissions by jurisdiction and tracks how greenhouse gas emissions are changing over time. Explore how and where local actions and strategies can reduce future greenhouse gases. 
 

 

Climate Vulnerability Assessment (CVA)—Interactive

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The Climate Vulnerability Assessment (CVA) is a tool that can assist the Council and local planning efforts in preparing and adapting to climate change. CVA reveals what systems (infrastructure, population, operations, etc.) are most vulnerable to currently occurring and, to some extent, expected climatic changes, depending upon multiple factors.  

Learn more about the assessment and access interactive tools and stories. 




 

Regional Climate Vulnerabililty Assessment


Regional Climate Vulnerability Assessment.png

The long-term trends of our Minnesota climate have been changing outside the bounds of typical, temporary variations. In the years and decades ahead, winter warming and increased extreme rainfall will continue to be Minnesota’s two leading symptoms of climate change. Heat waves will also likely occur with more frequency, coverage, and duration.

The Climate Vulnerability Assessment is a tool that can assist in Council and local planning efforts in preparing and adapting to climate change. The CVA reveals what systems (infrastructure, population, operations, etc.) are most vulnerable to currently occurring and, to some extent, expected climatic changes, depending upon factors such as asset exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. Learn more about the Climate Vulnerability Assessment

The Twin Cities Greenhouse Gas Inventory

The-Twin-Cities-Greenhouse-Gas-Inventory.png
Climate change is occurring all around the world, including right here in the Twin Cities region. Minnesota has already experienced more extreme rainfall and warmer winters due to climate change, and more changes are on the way. The good news is that local jurisdictions can take meaningful action now to address climate change. The Twin Cities Greenhouse Gas Inventory summarizes the sources of emissions by jurisdiction and tracks how greenhouse gas emissions are changing over time. Explore how and where local actions and strategies can reduce future greenhouse gases. 
 

 

Climate Vulnerability Assessment (CVA)

Climate Vulnerability Assessment tools.png


The Climate Vulnerability Assessment (CVA) is a tool that can assist the Council and local planning efforts in preparing and adapting to climate change. CVA reveals what systems (infrastructure, population, operations, etc.) are most vulnerable to currently occurring and, to some extent, expected climatic changes, depending upon multiple factors.  

Learn more about the assessment and access interactive tools and stories. 




 

We Still Need More Housing. The Region's Residential Development in 2018—Slides

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Using 2018 residential building permit survey and population estimates, research briefed the Community Development Committee on the following development and population trends occuring in the Twin Cities region: 
  • Residential development continues to increase and does not appear to have peaked yet. Nevertheless, our region is still not producing enough housing to keep pace with population growth. This puts more upward pressure on housing costs.​
  • The region has added a mix of multifamily and single-family detached units, but has not included many townhomes or duplex/triplex/quadplex units, which tend to be more affordable.
  • Development is happening throughout the region, but not in all places within cities.

Residential Development Patterns

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The Residential Development Patterns interactive summarizes Twin Cities juridictions' building permits for new residential construction projects since 2010. This dataset is developed from an annual survey of local governments about construction activity, and further verified with federal data sources, like the Residential Construction Branch of the Manufacturing and Construction Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. This data may be periodically updated to reflect corrections. Users can: 
  • Select a timeframe between 2010 and 2018 and a specific jurisdiction; 
  • Focus on specific housing types, like multifamily housing or single family homes
  • Narrow results to specific permit types: Were housing units added or lost? What was the net change? 
  • Map these selections for all jurisdictions in the Twin Cities region

Development data available in Community Profiles

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Our Community Profiles Tool provides trends for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. Building permits for residential and nonresidential development are available under the 'Land Use and Development' tab. 

 

Development data available in Download Data

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Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. Building permit data are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections: 

  • Affordable housing production
  • Building Permits, Residential
  • Building Permits, Commercial, Industrial, Public and Institutional

2019 Update to the Regional Forecast—Slides

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We have updated the regional forecasts every two years since 2015, most recently in October 2019. Major demographic shifts now underway will change our region dramatically. By 2040, the region's population will be

  • more racially and ethnically diverse;
  • older;
  • and more likely to live alone, or in larger households.
Watch the video of the presentation to Metropolitan Council here. 
 
Nothing published yet

Jobs and Workforce data available in Community Profiles

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Our Community Profiles Tool provides trends for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. Summarizing data from Minnesota's Department of Employment and Economic Development, Profiles have data about jobs, wages, and unemployment, 
 

 

Jobs and Workforce data available in Download Data

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Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. Data range from job-worker locations and forecasts,to  employment and wage data and are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections:

  • Demographic, economic, and commuting characteristics from the U.S. Census Bureau
  • Employment forecasts
  • Employment 
  • Wages
The following links offer additional research, tools, and other information relevant to economy and workforce in the Twin Cities region. Sharing does not imply endorsement or agreement with specific research findings or policy positions.

 

Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED)

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The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED)'s Data Center publishes a wide range of data tools and regularly updated reports on state and regional economic performance, labor markets, and other workforce and economic trends. 
 

 

GREATER MSP Partnership

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GREATER MSP Partership's Regional Economic Indicators Dashboard tracks the region’s annual change on critical economic, environmental, and social outcomes relative to 11 U.S. peer regions. 
 

 

The Center for Economic Inclusion

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The Center for Economic Inclusion is a cross-sector organization committed to strengthening the Minneapolis-St. Paul region’s civic infrastructure and collective capacity to disrupt systems and influence market forces to catalyze shared prosperity and advance an inclusive economy.

The Center and its partners developed
14 "Indicators of an Inclusive Regional Economy." Updated annually, these indicators disaggregate large regional economic trends by race and ethnicity.
 

Twin Cities Rent Trends—Interactive

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The Twin Cities Rent Trends interactive presents rent and vacancy trends for the Twin Cities region by jurisdiction or neighborhood, where available.

Timely data on rents can be difficult and costly to obtain, and different data sources can yield significantly different values. This interactive tool allows users to:
  • View rents and vacancy rates trends between 2010 and 2019 at sub-regional levels
  • Map rental costs region-wide
  • Compare three popular data sources: Zillow, CoStar, and Rental Revue.
  • Download the dataset, based on your selections



 

 

Affordable Housing Production in 2018—Slides

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We develop a dataset of region-wide affordable housing production based an survey of local jurisdictions and residential building permits issued annually. By tracking the price point of new home production, we can better understand the landscape of housing options for the region's current and future households and assess strategies against stated policy goals. The 2018 data showed the highest level of affordable housing production since 2006. However, the housing types and prices of these new units may not be accessible to the region's typical low- or moderate-income household. 

Watch the video of the presentation to Community Development Committee here

 

Metropolitan Council Area Trends, Preferences, and Opportunities: 2010 to 2020, 2030 and 2040
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Commissioned by the Council's Community Development Committee in 2014, Metropolitan Council Area Trends, Preferences, and Opportunities: 2010 to 2020, 2030 and 2040 (pdf) discusses how the  demographic shifts over the next three decades in the Twin Cities region will affect housing preferences and development. 







 



 


 

Choice, Place, and Opportunity: An Equity Assessment of the Twin Cities Region

Choice Place and Opportunity.png
Published in 2014, Choice, Place, and Opportunity: An Equity Assessment of the Twin Cities Region is an in-depth discussion of the region's race and poverty trends in the context of housing choice. 
  • Income and race can limit where people live. Since residents of color living in the Twin Cities region tend to have lower incomes than whites, income is more of a constraint for people of color when it comes to housing choice. Above and beyond income, however, race still influences where residents of color live in the region.
  • Looking at the Twin Cities region as a whole, opportunities such as jobs, high-performing schools and safe neighborhoods are unevenly distributed. Because of residential patterns, white residents and people of color live in different proximity to opportunity.

Twin Cities Rent Trends

Twin-Cities-Rent-Trends-Interactive-(3).png
The Twin Cities Rent Trends interactive presents rent and vacancy trends for the Twin Cities region by jurisdiction or neighborhood, where available.

Timely data on rents can be difficult and costly to obtain, and different data sources can yield significantly different values. This interactive tool allows users to:
  • View rents and vacancy rates trends between 2010 and 2019 at sub-regional levels
  • Map rental costs region-wide
  • Compare three popular data sources: Zillow, CoStar, and Rental Revue.
  • Download the dataset, based on your selections



 

 

Residential Development Patterns

Residential-development-patterns.png
The Residential Development Patterns interactive summarizes Twin Cities juridictions' building permits for new residential construction projects since 2010. This dataset is developed from an annual survey of local governments about construction activity, and further verified with federal data sources, like the Residential Construction Branch of the Manufacturing and Construction Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. This data may be periodically updated to reflect corrections. Users can: 
  • Select a timeframe between 2010 and 2018 and a specific jurisdiction; 
  • Focus on specific housing types, like multifamily housing or single family homes
  • Narrow results to specific permit types: Were housing units added or lost? What was the net change? 
  • Map these selections for all jurisdictions in the Twin Cities region

Existing Housing Assessments


Existing Housing Assessments are a useful starting point in understanding a jurisdiction's housing needs and current conditions. The data include: affordability level of existing housing units, tenure, housing types, publicly subsidized units, and housing cost burdened households. 

 

HUD Small Area Fair Market Rents for Metro HRA's service area

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The Minnesota Geospatial Commons is a collaborative place for users and publishers of geospatial resources about Minnesota. The term “geospatial resources” refers to the wide variety of data sources associated with particular geographic locations.

 

Housing data available in Community Profiles

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Our Community Profiles Tool provides trends for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. We have a wide range of housing data available in the 'Housing' tab, including housing stock and production, home values and sales, rents, tenure and vacancy. 

 

Housing data available in Download Data

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Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. A range of housing data are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections: 

  • Affordable housing production
  • Building Permits, Residential
  • Demographic, economic, and commuting characteristics from the U.S. Census Bureau
  • Housing Choice Vouchers
  • Price of Existing Home Sales
  • Housing Affordability Estimates
  • Housing Stock
  • Manufactured Home Parks
  • Publicly Subsidized housing
The following links offer additional research, tools, and other information relevant to housing in the Twin Cities region. Sharing does not imply endorsement or agreement with specific research findings or policy positions.

 

HousingLink


Housinglink dot org.pngHousingLink was organized in 1997 as a 501(c)3 organization to meet the affordable housing information needs of low- and moderate-income households. HousingLink provides affordable housing-related openings, data, information and resources, including 
  • Streams, a searchable database of subsidized rental housing in the Twin Cities metro
  • Housing Counts, an annual accounting of affordable housing production and preservation in the Twin Cities Metro, in partnership with Family Housing Fund.

 

Minnesota Housing Partnership 

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Minnesota Housing Partnership's (MHP) community developers, researchers and communicators, and policy advocates strive to create timely research that advances affordable housing policy and community development. They summarize critical housing measures, like housing cost burden and changes in home values and rents, at the state, regional, and county level and by legislative districts in annual profiles, among other relevant research reports. 

 

Minnesota Housing

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Minnesota Housing is the state’s housing finance agency. They publish research reports ranging from evaluations of state programs, services, and investments to the housing needs of specific populations and key issues and trends. 

 

Community Development Research and Place-Based Equity—Slides

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Since 2014 the Council has published data and reports on the region's Areas of Concentrated Poverty as a metric of regional equity. However, researchers ask if the emphasis on concentrated poverty as an outcome fails to draw focus to the broader systems of inequality and historic root causes like racially discriminatory practices that have created and perpetuated concentrated poverty, especially among the region's communities of color.

Watch the video of the presentation to Metropolitan Council here. 

 

Choice, Place, and Opportunity: An Equity Assessment of the Twin Cities Region

Choice Place and Opportunity.png
Published in 2014, Choice, Place, and Opportunity: An Equity Assessment of the Twin Cities Region is an in-depth discussion of the region's race and poverty trends in the context of housing choice. 
  • Income and race can limit where people live. Since residents of color living in the Twin Cities region tend to have lower incomes than whites, income is more of a constraint for people of color when it comes to housing choice. Above and beyond income, however, race still influences where residents of color live in the region.
  • Looking at the Twin Cities region as a whole, opportunities such as jobs, high-performing schools and safe neighborhoods are unevenly distributed. Because of residential patterns, white residents and people of color live in different proximity to opportunity.

Nothing published yet

Income and Poverty data available in Community Profiles

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Our Community Profiles Tool provides trends for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. U.S. Census Bureau data on income and poverty are available under the 'Income and Poverty' tab.


 

Income and poverty data available in Download Data

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Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. Income measures and wage data are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections: 

  • Demographic, economic, and commuting characteristics
  • Wages

Growing Greener, Getting Leaner: Land Use in the Twin Cities Region (2016)

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As the Minneapolis-St. Paul region develops land to meet the residential and employment needs of its growing population, land use changes. To capture these changing patterns, the Metropolitan Council periodically takes a snapshot of existing land use, interpreted and classified from region-wide aerial photography.

The 2016 report showed two key trends
  • The Twin Cities region now has the most park and recreation acreage in its history. The preservation of agricultural land ensures opportunities will remain long-term. New development, especially for residential purposes, is mostly occurring on previously undeveloped land and at higher densities.
  • The region is "doing more with less" in that land consumption to accommodate new population and household growth has required less acreage compared with previous years and has not resulted in net losses of other land use types, like agricultural land.​

Nothing published yet

Land use data available in Community Profiles

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Our Community Profiles Tool provides trends for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas.

Developed from digital aerial photography and property information from local sources, our Generalized Land Use dataset allows users to summarize changes in urban growth and development over time. By tracking land use changes, the Metropolitan Council and local planners can better visualize development trends and anticipate future growth needs. The most current inventory was completed 2016: The next will take place in 2020, with data released in 2021.
 

 

Land use data available in Download Data


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Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. Current planned land use and historic land use inventories are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections: 

  • Land use, regional planned (updated quarterly)
  • Land use inventory

Youth & Parks Participatory Action Research Project—Slides

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The Youth & Parks Participatory Action Research Project is currently underway—results will be shared in June 2020.

A research collaborative of youth-serving nonprofit organizations, youth and parent/guardian participants, university students, and Council research staff will generate and gather data using qualitative methods, such as in-park focus groups and observational field study. This study will explore access, priorities, and barriers experienced by youth. Learn more about the research questions, study approach and timeline (slides).

 

Youth & Parks Participatory Action Research Project

youth and park participants.png
The Youth & Parks Participatory Action Research Project is currently underway—results will be shared in June 2020.

A research collaborative of youth-serving nonprofit organizations, youth and parent/guardian participants, university students, and Council research staff will generate and gather data using qualitative methods, such as in-park focus groups and observational field study. This study will explore access, priorities, and barriers experienced by youth. Learn more about the research questions, study approach and timeline (slides).

 

Park Use Estimates Reports

2018 Parks Use Estimates

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The 2018 Park Use Estimates Interactive allows users to explore visits over time and visits by agency. The Council has estimated annual park use since 1995. These estimates inform how park funds, such as the State of Minnesota's Clean Water, Land & Legacy Amendment and the Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund, are distributed. The estimates also provide trends in visitation over time, providing a "big picture" view of the system.

Visitation data are collected within each park and trail during the summer (Memorial Day to Labor Day) and then expanded to produce an annual estimate. 
 
Several park datasets are available by request; please contact Darcie Vandegrift

2019 Update to the Regional Forecast—Slides

2019 Update of the Regional Forecast.png


We have updated the regional forecasts every two years since 2015, most recently in October 2019. Major demographic shifts now underway will change our region dramatically. By 2040, the region's population will be

  • more racially and ethnically diverse;
  • older;
  • and more likely to live alone, or in larger households.
Watch the video of the presentation to Metropolitan Council here. 
 
Nothing published yet

Long-range Forecasts and Population Estimates for small areas

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The Minnesota Geospatial Commons is a collaborative place for users and publishers of geospatial resources about Minnesota. The term “geospatial resources” refers to the wide variety of data sources associated with particular geographic locations.

Also, we publish simple formats (.pdf and excel files) of the most current long-range regional forecast and annual population estimates by jurisdiction on their respective web pages, or you can use the resources below to access this data.

 

Population data available in Community Profiles

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Our Community Profiles Tool provides trends for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. U.S. Census Bureau data on population characteristics are under the 'People' tab. Also under that tab are the Council's annual Population Estimates and long-range forecasts of people and households.

Population data available in Download Data

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Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. A range of population data are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections: 

  • Demographic, economic, and commuting characteristics
  • Population and household estimates
  • Population and household forecasts
The following links offer additional research, tools, and other information relevant to population characteristics and population change in the Twin Cities region. Sharing does not imply endorsement or agreement with specific research findings or policy positions.

Minnesota Compass at Wilder ResearchMinnesota-Compass.png


Minnesota Compass is a social indicators project that measures progress in our state and its communities. Led by Wilder Research, Minnesota Compass provides nonpartisan, credible information and tracks trends in topic areas such as education, economy, workforce, health, housing, and a host of others.

Geographic Profiles are available for the state as a whole, the seven regions of the state, Minnesota's 87 counties, and all cities with populations of 1,000+. Each profile contains demographic information and data across Compass topic areas, drawn from U.S. Census datasets, among others.


 

Census Reporter

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Census Reporter is a funded project designed to make it easier for journalists to write stories using information from the U.S. Census Bureau—and us researchers like it too. 

Place profiles and comparison pages provide a friendly interface for navigating data, including visualizations for a more useful first look. Sve the data you’re viewing in comma-separated value (.CSV), Excel (.XLS) or a variety of geographic data formats.
 

 

IPUMS National Historical Geographic Information System at the Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota


NHGIS.pngThe National Historical Geographic Information System (NHGIS) provides easy access to summary tables and time series of population, housing, agriculture, and economic data, along with GIS-compatible boundary files, for years from 1790 through the present and for all levels of U.S. census geography, including states, counties, tracts, and blocks. 

Visualizing Regional Inequities—Interactive

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Explore three decades of metro-level quality of life indicators disaggregated by race and ethnicity in the Visualizing Regional Inequities interactive. The 16-county Twin Cities metro area continues to rank highly among other U.S. metros for our impressive economic performance and relative housing affordability. However, underlying these high-level measures reveals that not all residents experience the overall successes of our metro area. Disparities in employment, poverty, income, and homeownership by race and ethnicity persist in the Twin Cities and—in some cases—are the largest nationwide.


 

Choice, Place, and Opportunity: An Equity Assessment of the Twin Cities Region

Choice Place and Opportunity.png
Published in 2014, Choice, Place, and Opportunity: An Equity Assessment of the Twin Cities Region is an in-depth discussion of the region's race and poverty trends in the context of housing choice. 
  • Income and race can limit where people live. Since residents of color living in the Twin Cities region tend to have lower incomes than whites, income is more of a constraint for people of color when it comes to housing choice. Above and beyond income, however, race still influences where residents of color live in the region.
  • Looking at the Twin Cities region as a whole, opportunities such as jobs, high-performing schools and safe neighborhoods are unevenly distributed. Because of residential patterns, white residents and people of color live in different proximity to opportunity.

Visualizing Regional Inequities

Visualizing-Regional-Inequities-Interactive.png
Explore three decades of metro-level quality of life indicators disaggregated by race and ethnicity in the Visualizing Regional Inequities interactive. The 16-county Twin Cities metro area continues to rank highly among other U.S. metros for our impressive economic performance and relative housing affordability. However, underlying these high-level measures reveals that not all residents experience the overall successes of our metro area. Disparities in employment, poverty, income, and homeownership by race and ethnicity persist in the Twin Cities and—in some cases—are the largest nationwide.

Disaggregated population data available in Download Data

Download-Data,-Regional-Disparities.png
Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. A range of population characteristics, like race/ethnicity, disability status, and household incomes are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections: 

  • Demographic, economic, and commuting characteristics

Historic Home Owners' Loan Corporation Neighborhood Appraisal Map


Screen-Shot-2020-04-18-at-1-02-26-PM.pngIn 1934, the Federal Housing Administration created a financial mortgage system that rated mortgage risks for properties based on various criteria but was centered on race and ethnicity. This rating system propagated racial segregation that in many ways persists today. 

Digitized from a photgraphic image,  this spatial allows users to compare historically characterized neighborhoods in relation to current demographic trends. The HOLC Appraisal Map is available to download at the Minnesota Geospatial Commons. 
The following links offer additional research, tools, and other information relevant to racial disparities in the Twin Cities region. Sharing does not imply endorsement or agreement with specific research findings or policy positions.

Mapping Prejudice Project, University of Minnesota 

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The Mapping Prejudice Project uses digital mapping software to organize, analyze and display historic data about the widespread practice of racially-restrictive deeds in twentieth century real estate transactions. Covenants were embedded in property deeds all over the country to keep people who were not white from buying or even occupying land. These restrictions served as powerful obstacles for people of color seeking safe and affordable housing. They also limited access to community resources like parks and schools. 
 

The Center for Economic Inclusion

CEI-logo-right.jpg
The Center for Economic Inclusion is a cross-sector organization committed to strengthening the Minneapolis-St. Paul region’s civic infrastructure and collective capacity to disrupt systems and influence market forces to catalyze shared prosperity and advance an inclusive economy.

The Center and its partners developed
14 "Indicators of an Inclusive Regional Economy." Updated annually, these indicators disaggregate large regional economic trends by race and ethnicity.

 

Disability Employment Statistics (MN DEED)

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The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development's Labor Market Information Office publishes a bi-monthly report on the state's disability employment statistics: "In 2018, Minnesotans living with disabilities continued to face significant barriers to realizing their full economic potential."
 

PolicyLink's National Equity Atlas

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The National Equity Atlas was developed as a tool to create a more equitable, sustainable, and resilient economy. It is a comprehensive resource for data to track, measure, and make the case for inclusive growth in America’s regions, and states, and nationwide. The Atlas contains data on demographic change, racial and economic inclusion, and the potential economic gains from racial equity for the largest 100 cities, largest 150 regions, all 50 states, and the United States as a whole.

 

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Traffic Tracking Tool—InteractiveCOVID-19-Traffic-Tracking-Interactive.png


The COVID-19 Traffic Tracking Tool uses traffic data from the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) to evaluate the impact of recent physical distancing efforts on regional and statewide travel. Using a modeling approach that relies on historical traffic data to estimate typical travel, Council researchers have shown that travel across the region’s freeways has declined in the weeks following the first COVID-19 case in Minnesota, on March 6th. This interactive is updated weekly. 

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Traffic Tracking ToolCOVID-19-Traffic-Tracking-Interactive.png


The COVID-19 Traffic Tracking Tool uses traffic data from the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) to evaluate the impact of recent physical distancing efforts on regional and statewide travel. Using a modeling approach that relies on historical traffic data to estimate typical travel, Council researchers have shown that travel across the region’s freeways has declined in the weeks following the first COVID-19 case in Minnesota, on March 6th. This interactive is updated weekly. 

Transportation data available in Community Profiles

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Our Community Profiles Tool provides trends for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. U.S. Census Bureau data on transportation and commuting are under the 'Commuting' tab. 
 

 

Transportation data available in Download Data

Transportation and commuting data is available to download.png
Our Download Data interface provides time-series data for the seven-county region and sub-regional areas like jurisdictions, Thrive MSP 2040 Community Designations, and transit station areas. A range of transportation and commuting data are available to download as comma-separated values files (.csv) under sections: 

  • Demographic, economic, and commuting characteristics
  • Travel time to selected destinations
  • Commuting data
The following links offer additional research, tools, and other information relevant to transportation in the Twin Cities region. Sharing does not imply endorsement or agreement with specific research findings or policy positions.

Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota

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The Center for Transportation Studies is the hub for transportation research and education at the University of Minnesota. It supports research in many disciplines, cultivates the transportation workforce, and shares new thinking with various stakeholders and audiences.